Wednesday, January 7, 2015

TRUE UNIT STABILITY
In 3S-1t, TRUE units can manifest as mass, energy or ג, in order to form symmetrically stable particles and the 168 total TRUE units of the Hydrogen atom may be arranged in another stable structural form, observed as the simple combination of one electron, one proton and one neutron, known as Deuterium, an isotope of Hydrogen (an atom with the same chemical properties).
Hydrogen 2 (Deuterium), Valence = -2 + 1 = -1
Particle
Charge
Mass/Energy
ג
Total TRUE Units
Volume
e
- 3
1
105
106
1,191,016
P+
+ 3
17
7
24
13,824
N0
0
22
16
38
54,872
Totals
0
40
128
168
(108)3

Hydrogen 2 (H2) is held together by electrical charge and 128 ג units, 22 less than the H1 atom. This means that H2 is not as stable as H1. What about other isotopes of H1? Is it possible that the TRUE units of a Hydrogen atom or a Deuterium atom can combine with one or more additional neutrons to form stable isotopes? Hydrogen 3 (H3), known as Tritium, is a second isotope of Hydrogen. Its form in TRUE units is represented below.
Hydrogen 3 (Tritium), Valence = - 2 + 1 = -1
Particle
Charge
Mass/Energy
ג
Total TRUE Units
Volume
e
- 3
1
105
106
1,191,016
       P+   
+ 3
17
7
24
13,824
2N0
0
44
32
76
438,976
Totals
0
62
144
206
(118.018…)3 *
*We see that H3 is an asymmetric structure. One electron, one proton and two neutrons, brought together by attractive forces, cannot combine volumetrically to form a symmetrically stable structure, and as a result, it is unstable and there are very few H3 atoms. Looking at the TRUE unit structure for H1, H2 and H3, we see that all three are bonded by electrical charge, but H1 has volumetric stability and 150 ג units holding it together; H2 has volumetric stability, more mass/energy units and fewer ג units than H1; and H3 has more mass/energy units and ג units, but no volumetric stability. This explains why H1 is the most abundant, H2 less abundant, and H3 correspondingly less stable. The atomic weights of the elements of the periodic table, in amu (atomic mass units), are actually the mean values of atomic masses calculated from a great number of samples. The accepted mean atomic weight for Hydrogen to four significant figures is 1.008. This includes H1 and all isotopes of Hydrogen. If all hydrogen atoms were H1 atoms, this number would be exactly 1. H1 is by far the most stable, and therefore, most abundant, of the Hydrogen family, making up more than 99.99% of all Hydrogen in the universe. Other H isotopes make up the remaining 0.01%, mostly H2, with H3 and other isotopes heavier than H2 occurring only rarely in trace amounts.
STABILITY AND PARTICLE BONDING
In this TRUE unit analysis of Hydrogen and its isotopes, we can identify the four forces that affect the stability of structures composed of protons, neutrons and electrons, holding together the entities that make up the physical universe. They are, in order of strength, dimensionometric tethering, represented by ג (gimmel), the attractive forces of electrical charge, magnetism and gravity. The first is the organizing force of the transfinite substrate, mediated by the conveyance equation to produce negative entropy. The last three are products of relative motion in resistance to negative entropy and universal expansion. First, structures with more ג units are more strongly connected with the nine-dimensional structure of the substrate. Second, if the collection of elementary particles cannot combine to form a symmetric structure in accordance with the FLT restriction and an integer solution of the Conveyance Equation, the collection of particles will not stay together long, even if attracted together by gravity, magnetism and opposite charge to become electrically neutral. The stronger forces of rotational expansion and the impacts of external forces will cause such structures to spiral and fly apart.
It may seem odd that the ratio of ג units to mass/energy units for the electron in these three atomic structures is so much greater than for the other elementary particles; but, as we saw above, these numbers are not arbitrary; they are dictated by the quantum nature of our 3S-1t reality, and the integer solutions of the Diophantine equations of the Conveyance Expression. Recall also, that units of ג, mass and energy, integrated through application of the principles of the Special Theory of Relativity and Quantum Mechanics, are equivalent in TRUE units. Thus, it should be expected that the volume the electron occupies in each orbital shell contributes more to the number of TRUE units for the electron in contrast with the other particles occupying less volumetric equivalence.
Note that atomic and sub-atomic structures are spinning like vortices connecting the dimensional domains. The stability of an atom is less than that of electrons, protons and neutrons. The stability of an atom depends upon whether its components can combine volumetrically, the attraction of the opposite electric charges of spinning electrons and protons, nuclear symmetric stability, and the symmetry created by their high rate of rotation, or vortical spin.
The impact of the ג units in 3S-1t observations reflects the logic of the conscious substrate, so thinking of ג as units of consciousness or intelligence, working through the equations of the Conveyance Expression is justifiable, and comparing the ratio of ג units to mass/energy units for elementary particles, elements, molecules and compounds provides a relative measure of consciousness in all physical structures. Finally, we see that with Hydrogen atoms and neutrons as building blocks, the entire periodic table of elements is produced and their physical and chemical characteristics can be explained in terms of their structure in TRUE units.

In the conventional description of the combining of elements and molecules to form new entities, first, two basic types of bonding are identified: covalent and ionic. Covalent bonding is also described as atoms sharing outer shell (valence) electrons. Ionic bonding occurs when ions of opposite electrical charge, are drawn together. An atom is called an ion when it has a different number of electrons than protons, and an atom with more electrons than protons is called a negative ion, and with fewer, it is called a positive ion. These two types of bonding seem simple enough, but it appears that there are more complex compound types of bonding that require additional descriptions and visual representations: There is polar covalent bonding, non-polar and hybrid bonding. There are Hydrogen bonds, metallic bonds, and Van der Waals bonds. We will not spend time discussing all of the types of bonding described in the current paradigm here, because TRUE unit analysis provides us with an almost entirely different way of understanding how particles combine.

Looking at the TRUE-unit structure of quarks, Hydrogen, Deuterium and Tritium, we see that the way the sub-atomic components are combined determines the symmetry and stability of the resulting compound entity. When three elementary particles combine, like the three quarks of a proton or neutron, with the necessary units of ג, they are combined volumetrically, forming a new symmetrically stable structure. This type of combination is the most stable. There are no electrons to be stripped off and such a compound particle can only be broken apart under extreme conditions, like the extreme heat and pressure in the heart of a star, or the ultra-high-energy collisions of a particle collider.

In H1, all of the TRUE units of the sub-atomic particles, the electron and proton, with their quarks, have combined and re-organized to form a new symmetric structure. Thanks to the stabilizing ג units they have combined volumetrically to form a symmetrically stable and electrically neutral entity, the Hydrogen atom. So instead of being inherently unstable, as it would be if only composed of one electron and one proton, with the necessary units of ג, the Hydrogen atom is very stable. However, because it has only one electron in its outer shell, which has room for two electrons, it is not nearly as stable as the proton and neutron bonding of quarks. H2 is volumetrically stable, but has a lower ג-to-mass/energy ratio than H1, making it still less stable. H3 could not combine volumetrically because it is composed of four sub-atomic entities, not three (FLT again) so it is asymmetric and even less stable, held together only by the attraction of equal and opposite electrical charge.

Using TRUE-unit analysis, we can investigate every possible combination of H1 atoms and neutrons and determine which combinations are the most stable.

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