Wednesday, January 7, 2015

STABILITY AND ABUNDANCE

TRUE UNIT ANALYSIS
Using TRUE-unit analysis, we can investigate every possible combination of H1 atoms and neutrons and determine which combinations are the most stable. After Tritium, the next stable combination of TRUE units, Helium, involves 336 TRUE units, as shown below.

HELIUM Valence = - 2 + 2 = 0 (Inert)
Particle
Charge
Mass/Energy
ג
Total TRUE
Units
Volume
2e
- 6
2
210
212*
9,528,128
      2P+   
+ 6
34
14
48
110,592
2N0
0
44
32
76
438,976
Totals
0
80
256
336
(2x108)3
Why is this not called “quadrium”, a third isotope of Hydrogen? It is a new element because it has two electrons filling its outer (and only) shell, so that it is not attracted to other atoms.
New elements arise when a unique new combination of TRUE units, constructed using multiples of the basic building blocks of electrons, protons and neutrons is formed. The next element is the combination of the inert atom, Helium, with the asymmetric atom, H3 with to form Lithium.
LITHIUM, Valence = – 2 + 3 = +1
Particle
Charge
Mass/Energy
ג
Total TRUE
Units
Volume
3e
- 9
3
315
318
32,157,432
      3P+  
+ 9
51
21
72
373,248
4N0
0
88
64
152
3,511,808
Totals
0
142
400
542
(330.32…)3 *
* Since the total volume is not an integer cubed, Lithium, like Tritium, is volumetrically asymmetric. It has a stronger electrical bond than H3 and more ג units connecting it with the multi-dimensional substrate for added stability, but it is less stable because it is asymmetric.
THE TERTIARY LEVEL OF SYMMETRIC STABILITY – MOLECULAR BONDING
We’ve seen how quarks combine in very stable symmetric triads of TRUE units and how atoms form stable or semi-stable vortices, spinning structures consisting of stable triads of protons, neutrons and electrons. A third level of stable and semi-stable structures occurs as molecules are formed from more complex combinations of elemental atoms.
The Role of Valence
The number of electrons in the outer shell of an atom determines the observable identifying chemical characteristics of an element and with which other elements it can combine. Due to the quantized attractive force of electrical charges, arising from quantized angular momentum and spin, electrons are attracted to the oppositely charged protons in the nucleus of an atom. Electrons, having a fraction (1/17) of the mass of photons, are pulled into orbit around the protons of an atom, forming specific finite, graduated concentric dimensional domains called “shells” enclosing the atom.
Using TRUE unit analysis, we find that, as a consequence of the size of the atom and the electron in TRUE units, the first shell has a volume of 212 TRUE units, the exact volume of two electrons. The second shell, with a larger diameter, has a volume of 848 TRUE units, and thus can contain 848/106 = 8 electrons. The maximum number of electrons that each shell can accommodate can be found by determining the volumetric equivalence of each shell in TRUE units. The maximum number of electrons in shells 1 through 6, respectively, is 2, 8, 18, 32, 50, and 72. As more complex atomic structures are formed by the addition of more of the building blocks, the finite volumes of the electron shells are filled with electrons, one after the other.
Atoms combine to form stable or semi-stable molecules in mathematically predictable ways, depending on the number of electrons in their outer-most shells. If an atom, even though electrically neutral and symmetrically stable, has room for one or more electrons in its outer shell, it can combine with another atom with that number of electrons in its outer shell to form a new structure. For example, an H1 Hydrogen atom, which has one electron in its two-electron-capacity shell, can combine with Lithium, which has its first shell filled, and one electron in its second shell. In another example of electron bonding, two Hydrogen atoms, with a combined two electron deficiency in the outer shells, can bond with one Oxygen atom which has two electrons in its outer shell. The first compound, Lithium Hydride, is never found in nature, while the second, H2O, is the most abundant compound in nature. Why?
We are now in a position to explain things with TRUE unit analysis that are not fully understood or well explained by the standard model. For example, why are some elements and compounds more abundant in nature than others? Why is the simple valence-bonded compound Lithium Hydride never found in nature, while Hydrogen Oxide (water), an only slightly more complex compound, is very abundant in nature?
Lithium Hydride is very unstable and reactive with other substances. The current paradigm tries to explain compound bonding in terms of outer shell electrons, largely ignoring the rest of the atom. With TRUE-unit analysis, we see that when bonding occurs, some compounds are able to form symmetric structures, while others are not. The reasons for this involve the total TRUE units of the whole structure, including the other electron shells and the nucleus, not just the outer electron shell. To illustrate this point, we can compare the TRUE unit analyses for LiH and H2O:
Lithium Hydride, Valence 4 - 2 = +2
Atoms
Particles
Charge
Mass/Energy
ג
Total TRUE
Units
Volume
Li + H2
4e
-12
4
420
424
76,225,024

4P+
+12
68
28
96
884,736

4N0+ Cג
0
88
102
190
6,859,000
Totals
0
0
160
512
672
83,968,760=(437.89…)3

H2O, Water, Valence =  -2 -8 + 10 = 0
Atoms
Particles
Mass/Energy
ג
Total TRUE
Units
Volume
2(H2)+O*
10e
10
1050
1060
1,191,016,000

10P+
170
70
240
13,824,000

8N0+2Cג
176
204
380
54,872,000

Totals
356
1,324
1,680
1,259,712,000=(1,080)3 =(10x108)3
* See detailed TRUE units analysis for Oxygen listed in order below.
Comparing the TRUE analysis for LiH with H2O, we can readily see why H2O is more stable, and consequently more abundant in nature. LiH is strongly electrically bonded, but symmetrically unstable with a valence of +2, while H2O is even more strongly bonded electrically, volumetrically stable, and has a stable outer electron shell. H2O also has 790 more units of ג connecting it more firmly with the multi-dimensional substrate.
In Dr. David Stewart’s brilliant work integrating science and spirituality, “The Chemistry of Essential Oils Made Simple, God’s Love Manifest in Molecules” ref, he notes that “Theoretically, the next simplest possible atom [after Hydrogen] would be two electrons orbiting around two protons …This would be Helium. …However, [this] is not how helium usually occurs in nature … For some unknown reason, nature does not like Helium without neutrons.”
TRUE unit analysis explains why nature does not produce Helium without neutrons. TRUE unit analysis reveals that sub-atomic particles combine to form new complex structures in several ways: They can be drawn together by the forces of gravity and magnetism, they can become attached, held together by equal and opposite electric charge, they can share valence electrons, and if they have the exact mix of TRUE units of mass/energy and ג that satisfies the conveyance equation, they will form a stable, dimensionally symmetric structure. On the other hand, if the mix of TRUE units cannot satisfy the conveyance equation, bonding will produce asymmetric forms which will be semi-stable, or if their outer shells are not full, even unstable, subject to breaking apart when impacted by external forces, while forms volumetrically symmetric, electrically neutral and without valence electrons will be very stable. Helium without Neutrons, i.e. 2e + 2P+, cannot form a symmetrically stable structure. See the TRUE analysis table below.
Helium without Neutrons:
Particle
Charge
Mass/Energy
ג
Total TRUE
Units
Volume
2e
- 9
2
210
212
9,528,128
      2P+  
+ 9
34
14
48
110,592
Totals
0
36
224
260
(212.917…)3 *
*While this combination is charge neutral, it is asymmetric, and therefore only semi-stable, easily broken apart.
But why doesn’t a Helium atom achieve stability with more ג units as H1 did?
Helium without Neutrons, with Volumetric Symmetric Stability from ג units:
Particle
Charge
Mass/Energy
ג
Total TRUE
Units
Volume
2e
- 6
2
210
212*
9,528,128
      2P+   
+ 6
34
14
48
110,592
2Cג
0
0
76
76
438,976
Totals
0
36
300
336
(2x108)3

To understand why this doesn’t happen, we have to look at all of the factors that contribute to the stability of an atom. The three major factors, in the three observable dimensions of 3S-1t, are electrical charge, angular momentum and symmetry. These factors depend on the quantized nature of mass, energy and ג, relative motion, and distance from the center of the atom. The overall stability of an atom depends on the combined effect of these factors on all three levels of the atom: the quark, nuclear, and electron shell levels. The effects of these factors are variably described in the current paradigm with terms like polarity, broken symmetry, quantum states, Eigen vectors, and parity.

The Helium atom has electron-shell stability because the first and only shell is full, while the Hydrogen atom does not, allowing it to compensate with ג units of the third form of Reality. As shown below, Helium with neutrons, 2e + 2P+ + 2N0 is volumetrically symmetric and electron-shell stable, and is, therefore, the form of Helium most often found in nature. Valence is an expression of the atom’s relative electron-shell stability. An atom with no valence atoms is very stable.

NEXT: It's no accident!

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