Sunday, December 13, 2015

THREE VERY IMPORTANT QUESTONS



THREE VERY IMPORTANT QUESTIONS

In this post I will address the following three very important questions:

Why is there something, rather than nothing?
What are the most elementary things that make up the something?
Why are these most elementary things spinning with so much energy?

Why are these questions so important? Because without the correct answers to these questions, all our knowledge and understanding of reality may be based on incorrect assumptions, and this could be very dangerous. We could easily make mistakes that could destroy us. 

But, you may say, modern science has been very successful at explaining how the world works. Surely the answers to these three questions are well known by mainstream scientists. Modern technology, based on the knowledge and understanding of modern science, has produced the amazing electronic devices that so enhance our lives today; and mainstream scientists speak confidently about the big bang origin of the universe, the quantum nature of matter, atomic structure, details of distant galaxies, and black holes. Surely they know what they are talking about, -- don’t they? How could mainstream science be so successful without knowing the answers to these very basic questions about the nature of reality?

Leibniz pointed out the importance of the first, most basic question in 1671, but science has ignored it, and finding the correct answers to the second and third questions depend upon having the correct answer to the first question. Leibniz also declared in his “Principle of Sufficient Reason,” that there is a correct answer for every question. If we don’t have an answer to the first question, our incomplete understanding of the other questions implies an answer to the first question by default, and if that answer is wrong, we are treading on thin ice. The use of the atomic bomb in World War II and the many environmental blunders we've made through the unwitting applications of our incomplete knowledge of physics and chemistry since are prime examples of why this is so dangerous. 

In posts to come, I will address each of the three questions, starting with the first.

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