Tuesday, December 29, 2015

PUTTING CONSCIOUSNESS INTO THE EQUATIONS PART 13


HYDROGEN AND THE ELEMENTS OF THE PERIODIC TABLE: APPLYING GIMMEL (PART 13)

The Hydrogen atom is unique among the natural elements in that it has only two mass/energy components, the electron and proton. Thus, because Fermat’s Last Theorem prohibits the symmetrical combination of two symmetrical particles; they cannot combine to form stable structures like the combination of quarks to form the proton and neutron. The electron, with a small fraction of the mass of the proton, is drawn by electric charge to whirl around the proton, seeking stability. This means that the Hydrogen atom, the elemental building block of the universe, composed only of the mass and energy of an electron and a proton, is inherently unstable. So why is it that we have any stable structures at all; why is there a universe? As Leibniz queried: “why is there something rather than nothing”?

One of the Xn integers must be 24 to represent the TRUE unit value of the proton, and one must be 38 to represent the TRUE unit value of the neutron. Among the integer solutions of the m = n = 3 conveyance equation listed above there are no primitive solutions with 24 and 38 as solution integers. But we can multiply the primitive solution 123 + 193 + 533 = 543 by 2 to get 243 + 383 + 1063 = 1083. Since there are no smaller integer solutions with 24 and 38 as terms in the left side of the equation, we can try the solution that provided a stable Helium atom: 243 + 383 + 1063 = 1083.
Since the Proton required 17 mass/energy units and 7 ג units, adding up to 24 Total TRUE units, to achieve triadic stability (see Tables describing the Proton), to achieve the same level of stability as the proton and neutron, the Hydrogen atom must have a third component. This satisfies the conveyance equation and produces a stable Hydrogen atom with a total volume of 1083.
Using these calculations to represent the Hydrogen atom, we have:

Table 13A-H1 TRUE-Unit Analysis for Hydrogen 1 (Protium), Valence = 1*
Particle
Charge
Mass/Energy
ג
Total TRUE Units
Volume
e
- 3
1
105
106
1,191,016
P+
+ 3
17
7
24
13,824
     ד
0
0
38
38
54,872
Totals
0
18
150
168
1,259,712=1083

By definition, the valence and the number of valence electrons is the same number for Hydrogen.
At this point, we are uncertain if this is the same third substance we have called gimmel, or could it be a fourth substance which we might call daled that is substituting for the TRUE units of the electron. We therefore provisionally call it Daled, the fourth letter of the Hebrew alphabet knowing that daled might turn out to be synonymous with gimmel ג . Differentiation at this point might be academic whether gimmel or daled are, in effect, the same, but it is critical to have this dichotomy at present. We could postulate that the Daled is just simply Gimmel ג again and write it in our tables as C ג   (“C-gimmel”) consisting of 38 units of that third form of the ‘stuff’ of reality. This way we recognize it is not measurable as mass or energy. The substitute for the lack of neutrons in Hydrogen-1 (Protium) is then in the form of gimmel or daled. This way, the fact that Hydrogen is stable and ubiquitous in the universe is explained and Hydrogen goes from an unstable compound to the compound with the most gimmel/daled of all the elements. For convenience, we’re just labeling this  ג.
However, this gives the Hydrogen atom far the most gimmel /daled. If that third and fourth (or further third) substance has substantial consciousness, this chemical hydrogen should be the major component in our cosmos in regard to something as opposed to nothing. And, as we know, Hydrogen is by far the most abundant and by far the most reactive element in the cosmos101.
Yet, without the ג units needed by Hydrogen to achieve stability, the universe as we experience it could not exist. The TRUE units of the two symmetrically stable entities found in the Hydrogen atom, the electron and proton, could not combine to form a third symmetrically stable entity (Fermat’s Last Theorem). Because they could not combine symmetrically, they would spiral and be easily separated by any external force. Even if they could adhere to other particles, the resulting universe would be very boring. All multiples of such a building block would have the same chemical characteristics. With the input of the appropriate number of ג units, however, Hydrogen exists as a basic building block of symmetrically stable forms in the 3S–1t observable domain of the physical universe we experience.

In 3S-1t, TRUE units can manifest as mass, energy or ג, in order to form symmetrically stable particles and the 168 total TRUE units of the Hydrogen 1 atom may be arranged in another stable structural form, observed as the simple combination of one electron, one proton and one neutron, known as Deuterium, an isotope of Hydrogen (an atom with the same chemical properties).
Hydrogen 2 (H2) (also called Heavy Hydrogen) is held together by electrical charge and 128 ג units, 22 less than the H1 atom. This means that H2 is not as stable as H1. But it still means that satisfying the conveyance equation we should be dealing with a somewhat stable element even if it is an isotope.
TABLE 13A- H2 TRUE-Unit Analysis for Hydrogen 2 (Deuterium), Valence = 1*
Particle
Charge
Mass/Energy
ג
Total TRUE Units
Volume
e
-3
1
105
106
1,191,016
P+
+3
17
7
24
13,824
N0
0
22
16
38
54,872
Totals
0
40
128
168
(108)3

What about other isotopes of H1? Is it possible that the TRUE units of a Hydrogen atom or a Deuterium atom can combine with one or more additional neutrons to form stable isotopes? Hydrogen 3 (H3), known as Tritium, is a second isotope of Hydrogen. Its form in TRUE units is represented below.
We see that H3 is an asymmetric structure. One electron, one proton and two neutrons, brought together by attractive forces, cannot combine volumetrically to form a symmetrically stable structure, and as a result, it is unstable and there are very few H3 atoms.

TABLE 13A- H3 TRUE-Unit Analysis for Hydrogen 3 (Tritium), Valence = -1 + 2 = 1
Particle
Charge
Mass/Energy
ג
Total TRUE Units
Volume
e
- 3
1
105
106
1,191,016
      P+   
+ 3
17
7
24
13,824
2N0
0
44
32
76
438,976
Totals
0
62
144
206
(118. 018…)3 *

Looking at the TRUE unit structure for H1, H2 and H3, we see that all three are bonded by electrical charge, but H1 has volumetric stability and 150 ג units holding it together; H2 has volumetric stability, more mass/energy units and fewer ג units than H1; and H3 has more mass/energy units and ג units, but no volumetric stability.


This explains why H1 is the most abundant, H2 less abundant, and H3 correspondingly less stable. The atomic weights of the elements of the periodic table, in “amu” (atomic mass units), are actually the mean values of atomic masses calculated from a great number of samples. The accepted mean atomic weight for Hydrogen to four significant figures is 1.008. This includes H1 and all isotopes of Hydrogen. If all hydrogen atoms were H1 atoms, this number would be exactly 1. H1 is by far the most stable, and therefore, most abundant, of the Hydrogen family, making up more than 99. 99% of all Hydrogen in the universe. 112 Other H isotopes make up the remaining 0.01%, mostly H2, with H3 and other isotopes heavier than H2 occurring only rarely in trace amounts. 

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